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conférences/écoles

RAPPEL: Journée de la Matière et des Systèmes Complexes le 30/11/2017 à l’ENS Paris-Saclay — date limite inscription: 15 novembre 2016

 

Petit mail de rappel sur la journée scientifique autour de Systèmes & Matière Complexes – deuxième édition qui se tiendra le 30 Novembre 2017 à l’Amphithéâtre Marie Curie de l’ENS Paris-Saclay à Cachan. Cette journée se déroulera en quatre sessions de présentations courtes de 4 min + 1 min de questions (trois planches maximum). Chacune de ces sessions sera précédée d’une conférence.

L’inscription est gratuite mais obligatoire (nombre de places limité) et le repas sera offert aux participants (aucun soutien financier ne sera accordé en dehors du repas et des pauses). La date limite pour l’inscription est fixée au 15 novembre 2017.

https://www.universite-paris-saclay.fr/fr/inscriptions-journee-de-la-matiere-et-des-systemes-complexes

Les orateurs invités pour cette deuxième édition sont :
Cécile Appert-Roland, Université Paris-Saclay
Kirsten Martens, Université Grenoble-Alpes
Olivier Theodoly, Université d’Aix-Marseille
Francois Ladieu, Université Paris-Saclay

L’objectif de cette journée est de permettre à la communauté systèmes & matière complexes de se rencontrer et d’échanger autour de ses thèmes de recherche qui sont, au sens large :
· les systèmes désordonnés,
· les fluides complexes,
· la dynamique complexe,
· les approches statistiques,
· les matériaux multi-échelle,
· les systèmes biologiques.

Nous demandons aux destinataires de ce mail de diffuser largement l’information dans leur laboratoire et plus largement à tout public intéressé.

Merci d’avance de votre aide.

Bien cordialement

Le comité d’organisation : H. Auradou, G. Baldinozzi, G. Biroli, D. Bonamy, C. Douarche, P. Guenoun, H. Henry, M. Lebental, L.T. Lee,
A. Rosso, conjointement avec les labex PALM et Nanosaclay

conférences/écoles

mini-symposium « mécanique des matériaux complexes et désordonnés » World Congress of Computational Mechanics (New-York,22-27/07/2018)

 

Cher collègues,

un mini-symposium sur « La réponse mécanique des matériaux complexes et désordonnés » est organisé au World Congress of Computational Mechanics à New-York du 22 au 27 jullet 2018 (http://www.wccm2018.org)
Les abstracts doivent être soumis dès maintenant et avant le 31 décembre à l’adresse suivante:

http://www.wccm2018.org/abstract-submission

En vous espérant nombreux à venir partager votre travail à ce congrès

Abstract: The mini-symposium WCCM 2018 MS 602 focuses on the small scale mechanical response of complex materials (disordered materials, glasses, granular media, beam lattices, fibreous materials, etc.) subjected to mechanical load. These materials exhibit complex inhomogeneous deformations, with strain localization and/or history dependence, yielding to unusual visco-plastic properties.
The application of numerical approaches for analyzing the response of the complex microstructure of disordered materials has resulted in a coupling between scales, with the goal of formulating a continuum description of the mechanical response at large scale from first principles. Such approaches include molecular dynamics simulations, smoothed particle hydrodynamics, coarse-graining methods, second-gradient or Cosserat modelization, and mesoscopic modelling.
The purpose of the meeting is to answer the following questions: How may one take into account the microstructure of such disordered materials? How much precision is required for adequately capturing particular properties? Is there a length scale dependence in the continuum description of such systems? What is the most appropriate way to transfer information from the lower to the upper length scale.
The mini-symposium will be organized into successive sessions, interspersed with time slots specifically devoted to thematic discussions.
It will promote interactions between participants from mechanical engineering, computational mechanics as well as condensed matter and statistical physics.

 

***
Pr Anne Tanguy
INSA Lyon
laboratoire LAMCOS
Bat. Joseph Jacquard
27 avenue Jean Capelle
F-69621 Villeurbanne cedex

conférences/écoles

APS March Meeting : plusieurs sessions

Dear Colleagues,

We are writing to bring your attention to the upcoming March Meeting of the American Physical Society in Los Angeles, CA (March 5-9, 2018). Our mechanics community continues to have a strong presence at the March Meeting, and we are pleased to announce several focus and invited sessions sponsored by the APS Groups on Statistical and Nonlinear Physics (GSNP) and Soft Matter (GSOFT). Full descriptions are available at the end of this email.

The deadline for abstract submission is November 3, 2017 at 11:59 p.m. ET. Abstracts can be submitted here: http://abstracts.aps.org/

Focus sessions include:

  • 01.1.22 Mechanics of Mechanical Networks (GSOFT, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 02.1.5, 03.1.9, 04.1.23]
  • 03.1.6 Morphable Structures (GSNP)
  • 02.1.7 Morphogenesis (DBIO, GSOFT, GSNP) [same as 03.1.10, 04.1.16]
  • 02.1.4 Origami and Kirigami Metamaterials (GSOFT, GSNP)
  • 02.1.3 Machine Learning in Nonlinear Physics and Mechanics (GSOFT, GSNP) [same as 03.1.14]
  • 03.1.3 Mechanical Metamaterials (GSNP, DPOLY, GSOFT, DBIO)
  • 01.1.23 Soft Interface Mechanics (GSOFT, DPOLY, DBIO) [same as 02.1.10, 04.1.28]
  • 02.1.11 Fluid Mechanics for Soft Matter (GSOFT, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 01.1.24, 03.1.15]
  • 3.1.4 Extreme Mechanical Instabilities, Defects, and Large Deformations (GSNP, DBIO) [same as 04.1.30]

When submitting your abstract, please make sure to include the relevant sorting category to ensure that your submission is not overlooked or misplaced.

We look forward to seeing you in LA. Should you have questions or concerns about the sorting process, please feel free to contact us.

Best Regards,

P.-T. Brun

and the co-organizers of the above sessions

 

Zi Chen (zi.chen@dartmouth.edu, Dartmouth)
Corentin Coulais (coulais@uva.nl, Amsterdam University)
James Hanna (hannaj@vt.edu, Virginia Tech)
Katharine E. Jensen (kej2@williams.edu, Williams College)
Francisco Jimenez (Francisco.LopezJimenez@colorado.edu, Boulder University)
Sung Hoon Kang (shkang@jhu.edu, Johns Hopkins University)
Eleni Katifori (katifori@sas.upenn.edu, U Penn)
John M. Kolinski (john.kolinski@epfl.ch, EPFL)
Andrej Kosmrlj (andrej@princeton.edu, Princeton)
Joel Marthelot (jgam@princeton.edu, Princeton)
Johannes Overvelde (overvelde@amolf.nl, AMOLF)
Pedro M. Reis (pedro.reis@epfl.ch, EPFL)
Zeb Rocklin (dzr3@cornell.edu, Cornell and Georgia Tech)
Shmuel M. Rubinstein (shmuel@seas.harvard.edu, Harvard)
Chris Rycroft (chr@seas.harvard.edu, Harvard)
Christian Santangelo (csantang@physics.umass.edu, U Mass Amherst)

 

01.1.22 Mechanics of Mechanical Networks (GSOFT, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 02.1.5, 03.1.9, 04.1.23]
Physical networks are foundational to the physics of polymers and biological tissues, and trussed systems have long been ubiquitous in engineering. Over the past few years, the study of mechanical networks has spread across length scales to encompass actin networks, venation networks in leaves, spider webs, stretchable electronics, mechanical metamaterials (including topological materials), textiles, and architectural gridshells. This focus session will provide a timely unified perspective to these networked systems, under the umbrella of the nonlinear physics of their underlying mechanics.
Organizers: Pedro M. Reis (preis@mit.edu, MIT) and Eleni Katifori (katifori@sas.upenn.edu, U Penn)

 

03.1.6 Morphable Structures (GSNP)
Structures which operate through significant geometric reconfiguration are ubiquitous in nature and engineering, including tree leaves, insect wings, ultralight spacecrafts, stents in angioplasty or pneumatically actuated soft robots. While there has been recent efforts in the study of the mechanics, the stability and the structural performance of these structures in the physics community, e.g. origami and kirigami, a unified approach to the design of structures able to achieve complex yet repeatable and programmable geometric reconfiguration remains elusive. A key challenge in the design of morphable structures is the non-trivial relationship between the actuation mechanism and the geometry and dynamics of the reconfiguration process. Controlled differential growth, pneumatic actuation, swelling, stored strain energy, osmotic or capillary effects can all be used as basic actuation mechanisms, driving single or multiple points of the structure. Recent advances in the field have focused in understanding how to embed the blueprint of the final configuration in the initial shape, and how the mechanics at the local scale (such as folds, hinges and kinks) affect the global reconfiguration process.
Organizers: Joel Marthelot (jmarthel@mit.edu, MIT), Pierre-Thomas Brun (Princeton), Francisco Jimenez (Boulder University)

02.1.7 Morphogenesis (DBIO, GSOFT, GSNP) [same as 03.1.10, 04.1.16]
The morphology of biological tissues and structures has long inspired scientific advances. Recent developments have focused on understanding the elaborate strategies developed by biological systems for regulating pattern formation and mechanical forces in both space and time. Morphogenesis is also a source of inspiration for designing shape-programmable, stimuli-responsive matter. This focus session will bring together researchers working on morphogenesis from diverse backgrounds to forge new interdisciplinary connections.
Organizers: Andrej Kosmrlj (andrej@princeton.edu, Princeton), Zi Chen (zi.chen@dartmouth.edu, Dartmouth)

02.1.4 Origami and Kirigami Metamaterials (GSOFT, GSNP)
Thin sheets possess mechanical properties programmed via patterns of folds (origami) and cuts (kirigami). From initially flat sheets, intricate three-dimensional structures are formed from the tabletop to the atomic scale and from outer space to the human heart. This focus session brings together researchers with diverse approaches to explore the varied mechanical properties of origami and kirigami metamaterials.
Organizers: Zeb Rocklin (dzr3@cornell.edu, Cornell and Georgia Tech), Christian Santangelo (csantang@physics.umass.edu, U Mass Amherst)

02.1.3 Machine Learning in Nonlinear Physics and Mechanics (GSOFT, GSNP) [same as 03.1.14]
Interest in machine learning applications to a variety of nonlinear and mechanical systems has been growing. The tool is now even affecting experimental design and data collection. This focus session aims to trigger discussions about machine learning in the context of bridging analysis and experiments.
Organizers: Chris Rycroft (chr@seas.harvard.edu, Harvard), Shmuel M. Rubinstein (shmuel@seas.harvard.edu, Harvard)

03.1.3 Mechanical Metamaterials (GSNP, DPOLY, GSOFT, DBIO)
The field of mechanical metamaterials aims at the development and understanding of materials that get their mechanical properties from their geometries, rather than solely from their chemistry. Thanks to the advent of advanced fabrication and computational techniques, the field has seen an explosion of activities. Particularly exciting directions include the creation of materials with novel and extreme mechanical properties (i.e. very light and very stiff), programmable, shape changing and advanced signaling materials, where often non-linearities play a crucial role. Lying at the cusp between physics, engineering, and mathematics, this session aims at bringing together researchers from diverse backgrounds to forge new interdisciplinary connections.
Organizers: Johannes Overvelde (overvelde@amolf.nl, AMOLF) and Sung Hoon Kang (shkang@jhu.edu, Johns Hopkins University), Corentin Coulais (coulais@uva.nl, Amsterdam University)

01.1.23 Soft Interface Mechanics (GSOFT, DPOLY, DBIO) [same as 02.1.10, 04.1.28]
The response of soft materials to stresses is often strongly influenced by boundary conditions. Given the many length scales that define the mechanical response of soft materials and the complexity that this response can have, even defining the experimental or theoretical questions that illuminate soft interface mechanics is a great challenge. This focus session highlights the latest advances in this area, covering systems ranging from fluids to solids, and showcases the new experimental and theoretical approaches that are pushing beyond the classical theories of interface mechanics.
Organizers: Katharine E. Jensen (kej2@williams.edu, Williams College), John M. Kolinski (john.kolinski@epfl.ch, EPFL)

02.1.11 Fluid Mechanics for Soft Matter (GSOFT, DPOLY, GSNP) [same as 01.1.24, 03.1.15]
Fluid mechanics plays a central role in soft matter physics, whether through capillary stresses at boundaries, establishing the bulk rheology for a porous medium, or in governing stresses acting on living materials. The many length scales of fluid flow in soft matter lead to the emergence of a variety of physical responses. This focus session will explore the central role played by fluid mechanics in determining the physics of soft and living matter.
Organizers: John M. Kolinski (john.kolinski@epfl.ch, EPFL), Pierre-Thomas Brun (Princeton, pbrun@princeton.edu, Princeton)

3.1.4 Extreme Mechanical Instabilities, Defects, and Large Deformations (GSNP, DBIO) [same as 04.1.30]
Linear stability analysis consistently overestimate the critical loads required for the collapse of loaded thin elastic structures when compared to observed values obtained though experiments. This discrepancy pertains to a plethora of mechanical systems ranging from friction, fracture and shell stability to turbulence in a pipe, and is primarily due to defects. Properly accounting for the role of defects requires understanding the non-linear failure mode in the presence of field focusing mechanism. Today, with unprecedented understanding in non-linear mechanical response we are better equipped than ever to address the subtle issues surrounding the loss of stability in such elastic systems and to lead to significant breakthroughs in their understanding exploiting both theory and experiment.
Organizers: Efi Efrati (efi.efrati@weizmann.ac.il, Weizmann) and Shmuel Rubinstein (shmuel@seas.harvard.edu, Harvard)

conférences/écoles

Modelling and Computational Challenges in Granular Flows, WCCM, 22-27/7, NY, USA

Chers collègues,

nous organisons, Ken Kamrin, Thomas Weinhart et moi-même, un mini-symposium intitulé “Modelling and Computational Challenges in Granular Flows” pour le 13ème World Congress in Computational Mechanics (WCCM), qui aura lieu du 22 au 27 juillet 2018 à New-York City. Le descriptif du mini-symposium est donné en fin de ce message.

Nous vous invitons à soumettre un abstract depuis le site de la conférence (http://www.wccm2018.org/), la date limite de soumission étant fixée au 31 décembre 2017.

N’hésitez pas à transmettre cette invitation à vos collègues ou étudiants !

Bien cordialement,

Ken, Thomas et Rudy

Session details:

Title: Modelling and Computational Challenges in Granular Flows

Keywords: Granular flows, Computational Methods, Fluid Dynamics.

Abstract: Granular flows are ubiquitous in many fields such as industrial processing, mining, energy production, food powders, biology, geoscience, or mechanical and civil engineering. The analysis and prediction of these flows is challenging as they often occur in complex geometries and their rheology can be influenced by many microscopic and macroscopic parameters. Different computational approaches exist:

– Discrete particle methods (DPMs) are a very powerful computational tool that allows the simulation of individual particles with complex interactions, arbitrary shapes, in arbitrary geometries, by solving Newton’s laws for each particle. This means elaborate interactions of sintering, breaking and agglomeration of particles can be captured by the contact model. However, this method is computationally expensive and is not able to deal with the vast number of particles involved in full-scale industrial or environmental situations.

– On the other hand, continuum methods can simulate the volume of real industrial flows, but have to make averaging approximations and require physical modelling, sometimes inspired by DPM results. Once these averaged parameters have been tuned via experimental data, these models can be surprisingly accurate but their general applicability is still to demonstrate.

An accurate prediction of granular flow is very important for the efficiency and safety of the design of many engineering and industrial applications. This mini-symposium aims to provide an opportunity for physicists, engineers, applied mathematicians and computational scientists to discuss the current progress and latest advancements in the field of advanced modelling and numerical methods for predicting granular flows. The focus will be on new rheological models, computational methods, improved algorithms and the modelling of interesting industrial and academic applications. Submissions can include, but are not limited to the following aspects: capturing shape and surface properties of grains; erosion and deposition; segregation; sintering; fluid-particle interaction; cohesive grains; non-local continuum theories; applications; and, description of benchmark problems for the community.

conférences/écoles

Réunion GDR « nouveaux défis en mécanique de la rupture » (27 et et 28 novembre 2017)

le GDR MePhy et l‘Institut Jean Le Rond d’Alembert organise un atelier de deux jours les 27 et 28 novembre 2017 sur les nouveaux défis en mécanique de la rupture.

voir la page web de la rencontre : https://blog.espci.fr/mephy/2017_3/

De nombreuses avancées ont eu lieu ces dernières années en mécanique de la rupture. Citons par exemple

  • Rupture de matériaux hétérogènes et approches statistiques
  • Rupture dynamique
  • Friction en relation avec la rupture en mode II
  • Rupture en mode I+III  (seuild d’instabilité / fragmentation du front de fissure …)
  • Transition fragile/ductile (aspects atomistiques … )
  • Critères d’amorçage de fissure (approche variationnelle / critères mixtes … )
  • Trajets de fissure (interaction entre fissure / structure élancées / instabilités …)

Le but de ces journées et de faire le point sur ces développements récents, et de présenter également les nouvelles questions d’intérêt pour les années à venir.

Nous  souhaitons accueillir les présentations d’un maximum de participants. Les présentations de doctorants/jeunes chercheurs seront particulièrement appréciées afin de faire un état des lieux des recherches en cours.

 


Inscriptions avant le 10 novembre

Inscription gratuite mais obligatoire.

Réponse à retourner à mephy@pmmh.espci.fr avec les renseignements suivants:

 NOM:
 Prénom:
 Laboratoire:
 Je souhaite faire une présentation sur le sujet:
 inscription pour le déjeuner 27/11 (O/N) :
 inscription pour le repas du soir 27/11 (O/N) :
 inscription pour le déjeuner 28/11 (O/N) :
conférences/écoles

Fundamental Problems in Active Matter (Aspen 2018)

Dear colleagues,

We are delighted to invite you to participate in the ASPEN winter conference on « Fundamental Problems in Active Matter ». The conference will be held at the Aspen Center for Physics from Sunday, January 28 to Saturday, February 3, 2018:

http://fpam.msc.univ-paris-diderot.fr/

The past few years have witnessed an upsurge of studies at the crossroads of chemistry, biology, and physics. The aim of this Aspen Winter Conference is to bring together, through talks and focused discussions, researchers from these diverse disciplines to exchange viewpoints and chart a roadmap going forward that melds the different approaches to the study of this exciting area.

A typical day will be organized around talks in the morning and in the evening, and focused discussions in between. There will also be ample time to benefit from informal discussions with colleagues, as well as taking full advantage of the nearby ski resort. The Aspen Center for Physics also offers offices which can be used for private discussions and work. We hope to see all the registered attendees through the entire conference, arriving on Sunday and leaving on Saturday.

Registration fees are $400 per person. Everyone, including organizers and invited speakers, must pay the registration fee. It is refundable, if attendance is cancelled. No food is included in this fee. The registration can be done on the website of Aspen Center for Physics: http://aspenphys.org/physicists/winter/reghousing.html

*Deadline to apply is October 31, 2017.*

Limited and partial financial support may be available, aimed preferentially towards young researchers, based on merit and need.

Please find below a list of invited participants.

Best wishes,

Aparna Baskaran, Ayusman Sen, Julien Tailleur

* Igor Aranson (Penn State)
* Dean Astumian (University of Maine)
* Anna Balazs (University of Pittsburgh)
* Denis Bartolo (ENS Lyon)
* Andreas Bausch (Technische Universität München)
* Mark Bowick (Syracuse University)
* John Brady (California Institute of Technology)
* Chase Broederz (Ludwig Maximilians Universität München)
* Hugues Chaté (CAE Saclay)
* Cécile Cottin-Bizonne (Université Lyon 1)
* Roberto Di Leonardo (Sapienza Università di Roma)
* Nikhta Fakhri (MIT)
* Peer Fischer (Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems)
* Seth Fraden (Brandeis University)
* Ambarish Ghosh (Indian Institute of Science)
* Jeff Gore (MIT)
* Steve Granick (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
* Oskar Hallatschek (Berkeley University of California)
* Yariv Kafri (Technion)
* Raymond Kapral (University of Toronto)
* Kirill Korolev (Boston University)
* Eric Lauga (University of Cambridge) ∗
* Cristina Marchetti (Syracuse University)
* Michael Murrell (Yale University)
* Daniel Needleman (Harvard University)
* Nicholas Ouellette (Stanford University)
* Jeremy Palacci (University of California San Diego)
* Wilson Poon (University of Edinburgh)
* Jennifer Ross (University of Massachusetts Amherst)
* Samuel Sánchez (Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia)
* Alvaro Sanchez (Yale University)
* Masaki Sano (the University of Tokyo)
* Michael Shelley (New York University)
* Alexandre Solon (MIT)
* Vincenzo Vittelli (Leiden University)

∗ To be confirmed

 


Dr Julien Tailleur
Responsable de l’équipe Théorie des Systèmes Complexes
Laboratoire MSC
Université Paris Diderot
Bâtiment Condorcet
10 rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet
75205 Paris cedex 13
Tél : +33 (0)1 57 27 70 64
Fax : +33 (0)1 57 27 62 11
web : http://www.msc.univ-paris-diderot.fr/~jtailleu/

conférences/écoles

Réunion GdR MéPhy Fibres et milieux fibreux 04 décembre 2017

Réunion GdR MéPhy le lundi 04 décembre 2017

*Fibres et milieux fibreux*

Le GdR MéPhy organise un atelier sur les systèmes composés de fibres:
– suspensions de fibres denses ou diluées;
– empilements de fibres et systèmes enchevêtrés;
– réseaux de fibres biologiques, notamment actifs.
Il s’agit en particulier de discuter du rôle du rapport d’aspect, de la rigidité, de la fraction volumique et du frottement des fibres sur les propriétés mécaniques et rhéologiques des milieux fibreux, ainsi que de l’interaction fluide-structure sur la dynamique de transport de fibres. Cette journée sera l’occasion de réunir des communautés voisines, travaillant à différentes échelles, pour discuter ensemble de ces thèmes.

La réunion aura lieu le lundi 04 décembre 2017 à l’ESPCI, amphi Urbain.
Inscription gratuite mais obligatoire.
Page oueb de la rencontre:

2017_2

Réponse à retourner à mephy@pmmh.espci.fr avec les renseignements suivants:
NOM:
Prénom:
Laboratoire:
Je prendrai le déjeuner sur place:
Je souhaite faire une présentation sur le sujet:

 

Comité d’organisation de cette journée: P. Claudin, A. Lindner & D. Rodney

conférences/écoles

European Solid Mechanics Conference (Bologne, juillet 2018)

Dans le cadre de  10th European Solid Mechanics Conference (juillet 2018, à Bologne),  le GDR participe à l’organisation d’un mini-symposium:
The past years have seen a renewed interest in the physics community for solid mechanics. Physicists, mainly condensed matter physicists, have started to revisit problems of mechanics and materials, thought to be classical by engineers and mechanicians. This renewed interest brought a research stimulus in the solid mechanics community. An example can be found in the theme of elastic structures where buckling, once thought as something to avoid, is now used to design and optimize systems: soft structures working in the post-critical regime are bringing new functionalities while still exhibiting excellent mechanical performances. Other examples can be found in biomechanics, the interplay between fluid and solids, growth and form, fracture mechanics.

The goal of this mini-symposium is to bring the solid mechanics and physics communities together for exchange of ideas, cross-fertilization, and new collaborations. We believe each community has its own tools and paradigms to bring: statistical physics on one side, and continuum mechanics on the other for example. We believe the emerging mechanics-physics community will be gathered around common tools (applied mathematics, nonlinear dynamics, proof-of-concept experiments, …) rather than a precise theme.

 

examples (images : C.Coulais / D.Vella / N.Vandenberghe / L.Ponson / N.Tryantafillidis/ A.Lazarus / M.Arroyo) .

important dates for ECSM2018

November 15, 2017 Deadline for abstract submission

January 31, 2018  Notification of abstract acceptance

March 31, 2018  Deadline for early registration

July 2 – 6, 2018    10th European Solid Mechanics Conference, Bologna

Organizers
Sebastien Neukirch (CNRS/UPMC),
Benoit Roman (CNRS/UPMC),
Keith Seffen (University of Cambridge),
Francesco Dal Corso (University of Trento)
conférences/écoles

Mini-Symposium on Homogenisation, European Solid Mechanics Conference (Bologna, July 2018)

Mini-symposium description

Composite materials are considered in a very broad sense. A matrix phase can be reinforced/weakened with continuous fibers, short fibers, particles or platelets or even more phases. The matrix materials can be thermoset polymers, thermoplastic polymers, elastomers, gels, metals, concrete etc. The reinforcements can be continuous Carbon or ceramic fibers, short glass fibers, nanoclay particles, Carbon nanotubes, iron particles, multi-phase alloys (e.g., TRIP steels) among others. The effective response thus can be mechanical, electrical, magnetic, thermal or any combination of those, e.g., magnetoactive, electroactive, thermomechanical etc.

In addition, porous or micro-cracked materials are also viewed in this MS as « composites », where the matrix phase can contain micro-cavities or micro-cracks.

The present MS invites contributions for all the above-mentioned cases with an emphasis on the micromechanical, homogenization, scale-transition or multi-scale modeling methods that could also include experiments. Non-restrictive examples are the following:

– direct finite element simulations of representative volume elements;

– methods of cells, subcells and transformation field analysis;

– asymptotic or mathematical homogenization theory;

– mean-field homogenization methods;

– linking continuum mechanics at the matrix phase level and molecular dynamics or atomistic scale simulations at the levels of nano-particles or matrix/inclusions interphases or interfaces.

– homogenization of active composite materials such as magnetoactive or electroactive polymers, piezoelectric composites etc.

Emphasis is put on the nonlinear behavior such as nonlinear elasticity, plasticity, viscoplasticity, coupled elasto-viscoelasticity-viscoplasticity, damage, fatigue, etc., at small or large deformations.

 

Important dates for ECSM2018

November 15, 2017 Deadline for abstract submission

January 31, 2018  Notification of abstract acceptance

March 31, 2018  Deadline for early registration

July 2 – 6, 2018    10th European Solid Mechanics Conference, Bologna

Organizers
Issam Doghri (Université catholique de Louvain),
Kostas Danas (Ecole Polytechnique),
Nicolas Triantafyllidis (Ecole Polytechnique),
Pedro Ponte Castañeda (University of Pennsylvania)
conférences/écoles

Complex and Disordered Materials, World Congress on Computational Mechanics (New York, July 22-28, 2018)

A mini-symposium entitled “Mechanical response of complex and disordered materials” will take place 
at the 13th World Congress on Computational Mechanics to be held July 22-27, 2018 in New York City.

Abstract: This mini-symposium focuses on the small scale mechanical response of complex materials (disordered materials, glasses, granular media, beam lattices, fibreous materials, etc.) subjected to mechanical load. These materials exhibit complex inhomogeneous deformations, with strain localization and/or history dependence, yielding to unusual visco-plastic properties.
The application of numerical approaches for analyzing the response of the complex microstructure of disordered materials has resulted in a coupling between scales, with the goal of formulating a continuum description of the mechanical response at large scale from first principles. Such approaches include molecular dynamics simulations, smoothed particle hydrodynamics, coarse-graining methods, second-gradient or Cosserat modelization, and mesoscopic modelling.
The purpose of the meeting is to answer the following questions: How may one take into account the microstructure of such disordered materials? How much precision is required for adequately capturing particular properties? Is there a length scale dependence in the continuum description of such systems? What is the most appropriate way to transfer information from the lower to the upper length scale.
The mini-symposium will be organized into successive sessions, interspersed with time slots specifically devoted to thematic discussions.
It will promote interactions between participants from mechanical engineering, computational mechanics as well as condensed matter and statistical physics.

More informations on http://www.wccm2018.org/
Call for abstract will start in the mid-October

Waiting to see you there

Tristan Albaret, Michael Falk, Anne Tanguy, Damien Vandembroucq